English – Stage 2

Students may study either Stage 2 Essential English, Stage 2 English or Stage 2 English Literary Studies depending on ability and achievement.  Please contact the appropriate staff member to discuss which course is most suited.

Staff Contact

Judy Hickey jhickey@navigator.sa.edu.au

 

SACE Credits

Each course attracts 20 credits (Full Year)

 

Stage 2 Essential English

Required Background

Successful completion of Stage 1 Essential English, or by negotiation with the English Coordinator.

 

Course Outline

Stage 2 Essential English builds upon the foundations of Stage 1 Essential English and allows students to respond to and create texts for a range of personal, social, cultural, community, and workplace contexts. Students understand and interpret information, ideas and perspectives in texts and consider ways in which language choices are used to create meaning.

 

Course Content

Students undertake tasks within the following:

  1. Responding to Texts
  2. Creating Texts
  3. Language Study (External Component)

 Responding to Texts

Students respond to a range of texts that instruct, engage, challenge, inform and connect readers. They consider information, ideas, and perspectives represented in the chosen texts. For example, students might view and analyse the dystopian elements in Wes Ball’s The Maze Runner; select and read a biography of someone they are interested in and consider the information and perspectives presented; and respond to Michael Moore’s Bowling for Columbine.

 Creating Texts

Students create procedural, imaginative, analytical, interpretive, or persuasive texts appropriate to a particular context. For example, students might create an imaginative narrative with Dystopian overtones; present an autobiographical memoir as a digital book or written recount; and create an advocacy speech on a topic of interest to them.

 

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School Based Assessment – 70%

Assessment Type 1:            Responding to Texts (30%)

Three responses – at least one must be written and one oral or multimodal.

Assessment Type 2:            Creating Texts (40%)

Three creative texts – at least one must be written and one oral or multimodal.

External Assessment – 30%

Assessment Type 3: Language Study:

 

Information on the External Assessment

Language Study:

This study focuses on the use of language in a context outside of the classroom. Students select from one of the following contexts:

  • Workplace, training or volunteering
  • Virtual social networking
  • A recreational or personal interest (e.g. sport, reading, music)
  • Education or academic
  • Cultural (e.g. festival, language group)
  • The local community
  • A community of interest.

Students consider the language used in their chosen context, including how ideas, information and perspectives are communicated.

 

Stage 2 English 

Required Background

Successful completion of Stage 1 English, or by negotiation with the English Coordinator.

 

Course Outline 

Stage 2 English focuses on both the analysis of a range of text-types and the production of a range of creative texts.  Students analyse the interrelationship of author, text, and audience, with an emphasis on how language and style features shape ideas and perspectives, and they explore how the purpose of a text is achieved through application of textual conventions and stylistic choices to position the audience to respond to ideas and perspectives. In Stage 2 English students have opportunities to reflect on their personal values and those of other people by responding to aesthetic and cultural aspects of texts from a range of times and cultures.

 

Course Content

Students undertake tasks within the following:

  1. Responding to Texts
  2. Creating Texts

Responding to Texts

Students will read and view a range of texts (novel, film, poetry), including a text created by an Australian author. The study of texts will involve comparing and contrasting the distinctive features of text types from the same or different contexts. Students will focus primarily on a shared reading of a variety of texts. For example; The Messenger Markus Zusak (Novel), Skyfall Sam Mendes (Film), a range of poets such as Maya Angelou, Langston Hughes, Gwen Harwood, and so on.

Creating Texts

Students create a range of texts for a variety of purposes through experimenting with innovative and imaginative language features, stylistic features, and text conventions. For example; narrative writing, a reflective speech or multimodal, a video or written script.

 

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School Based Assessment – 70%

Assessment Type 1:            Responding to Texts (30%)

Three responses; two must be written (a total of 2000 words), one must be oral ( a total of 6 minutes).

Assessment Type 2:            Creating Texts (40%)

Three texts (a total of 3000 words), plus a writer’s statement (a total of 1000 words). At least one text must be written.

External Assessment – 30%

Assessment Type 3: Comparative Analysis

 

Information on the External Assessment

Comparative Analysis

This comprises of an independent study of TWO texts not studied in class as shared texts. Students must devise a question and write a maximum of 2000 words.

 

Stage 2 English Literary Studies

Required Background

High achievement grades in Stage 1 English.

 

Course Outline

Stage 2 English Literary Studies allows students to study and analyse a range of literature, and produce some creative texts. It focuses on the skills and strategies of critical thinking needed to interpret texts. Through the study of a novel, film, play, poetry, and short texts, students will encounter different opinions, have opportunities to exchange and develop ideas, find evidence to support their views, learn to construct logical and convincing arguments, and consider a range of critical interpretations of texts. English Literary Studies also focuses on the ways in which literary texts represent culture and identity, and on the dynamic relationship between authors, texts, audiences, and contexts. Students will produce responses that show the depth and clarity of their understanding.

 

Course Content

Students undertake tasks within the following:

  1. Responding to Texts
  2. Creating Texts

Responding to Texts

This component consists of SHARED STUDIES and a COMPARATIVE TEXT STUDY

  1. Shared Studies

Among the texts chosen for Shared Study there must be a:

  • Study of three texts
    • One novel (e.g. George Orwell’s 1984 or Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner)
    • One film text (e.g. Ray Lawrence’s Lantana)
    • One drama text (e.g. Arthur Miller’s The Crucible or William Shakespeare’s Hamlet)
  • Study of poetry (e.g. Wordsworth, Blake, Keats, Coleridge, Hopkins)
  • Study of a range of short texts
  1. Comparative Text Study

This study involves the comparative study of two texts: one from the Shared Studies texts and the other chosen independently by the student.

 

Please see the attached Prescribed Text list.

Text List English Literary Studies

 

Creating Texts

This component consists of TRANSFORMING TEXTS and CREATING A TEXT:

  1. Transforming texts

Students develop their understanding of genre by considering how texts may be transformed and will learn ways to create a new text by converting or reimagining a text to reflect a new social or cultural context.

  1. Creating a Written, Oral, or Multimodal Text

Students create a text that demonstrates understanding and mastery of the features of the chosen text type.

 

Assessment

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School Based Assessment – 70%

Assessment Type 1:            Responding to Texts (50%)

Up to 5 responses – one of which must be an oral or multimodal.

Assessment Type 2:            Creating Texts (20%)

2 tasks.

 External Assessment – 30%

Assessment Type 3: Text Study:

Part A: Comparative Text Study (15%)

Part B: Critical Reading (15%)

 

Information on the External Assessment

  1. Part A: Comparative Text Study

This response is a critical essay of 1500 words. Students compare ONE shared studies text and another text of their own choice, they frame their own question and develop their response during the year.

 

  1. Part B: Critical Reading

The critical reading is a 90-minute examination developed by the SACE Board. It will involve analysing a text – prose, fiction, non-fiction, poetry, visual elements, excerpts from films or soundtracks.